Lion Au Serpent

Lion Au Serpent
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559a
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559b
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559c
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559d
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559e
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559f
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559g
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559h
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559i
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559j
  • Antoine Louis Barye Animalier Bronze Lion Au Serpent 4559k

A powerful and impressive French bronze study of a Lion holding down a snake beneath his paw, with excellent hand chased surface detail and rich brown patination in variegated shades to the raised areas, signed BARYE and inscribed F Barbedienne. This is a very large and rare example of this important sculpture, considered to be a pivotal composition of Barye’s early career.

 

An interesting quote by Leon Bonnat:

“A lion passes – a boa bars his way; down come the terrible claws, and while the serpent, taken as in a vice, coils his folds, desperate with pain, and in dying tries with a supreme effort to avenge himself, the mighty beast rests impassible before his treacherous foe; scarcely does he deign to turn his gigantic head or lightly raise his mane, at most opposing a deep growl to the despairing hiss of his enemy. But the claw works, the marvellous claw, and everything is in that. Admire it: the hair is spread to let the talons, terrible weapons, penetrate without hindrance, to have their full play in the flesh; and, cutting as lancets, they have but to react and close upon themselves. And all the play is done.”

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£ 13,500

In stock

Additional Information

Height

Condition

Circa

Foundry

Materials

Bronze

Book Ref

BARYE Catalogue Raisonne des Sculptures by Michel Poletti – Alain Richarme

Page No.

172

Book Ref

Les Animaliers by Jane Horswell

Page No.

58

Barye – An impressive figure of a wild roaring lion pins a serpent to the ground. Head thrown back, jaws wide open, the reptile hisses back defiantly. Owing to the extremely naturalistic rendering of both animals and the violence of the struggle depicted, this sculpture caused a huge controversy. The public and the Romantics acclaimed it. Conservative critics lamented the fact that the Tuileries Gardens, the sculpture’s future home, would be turned into a zoo.

True to life

Barye sculpted animals in an unprecedented manner. First, they were the actual subject of his sculpture, and not simply accessories. Secondly, his interpretation was based on an exact and faithful analysis of nature. He sought to convey an illusion of fur, lifelike movements, and the untamed character of the animals. The lion has real substance; one can feel the muscles rippling under his pelt. Alongside the painter Delacroix, Barye spent hours on end studying, drawing, and even dissecting animals in the Jardin des Plantes. But the sculptor was no slave to his scientific knowledge: he recreated nature with the means of his art. He was occasionally compelled to exaggerate a muscle, highlight the modelling, and emphasize a line in order to give a true impression of life.

Epic inspiration

Barye instilled an epic dimension into this fight. He captured the moment when the action seems suspended in time. A dramatic element is added as the two animals size up each other’s chances, anticipating the frenetic struggle to follow. Although the lion has the advantage, he remains vigilant, as can be seen from the way he spreads his claws, the position of his tail, and his bristling mane. The tension is at its peak. The snake, whose coiled head is thrown back, jaws wide open, is ready to strike at the lion’s face. The lion’s concentrated energy is set to respond: with puckered muzzle, furious eye, and fore-paw forcefully pinning the reptile to the ground, his body is pure muscle. Both animals possess the power of life and death, which could not fail to fascinate the Romantics. The size of the sculpture heightens its impact.

Monarchist symbolism

The lion is the supreme example of a monarchic animal, a symbol of force and courage. This sculpture is thus also a tribute to the July Monarchy and King Louis-Philippe, at a time when there was widespread discontent with the regime established after the July Revolution (1830). The king’s accession to the throne had taken place under the constellations of Leo (the lion) and Hydra (the sea serpent). The sculpture therefore symbolized celestial approval of this political change.

To view a further selection of outstanding Barye sculpture click here: Barye Bronzes

SKU: 4559

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