GALLERY EIGHTY FIVE | 85A PORTOBELLO ROAD | LONDON | W11 2QB | Tel + 44 (0) 7971 850 405 | EMAIL DAVID@HICKMET.COM
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    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: BRUNO ZACH

    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: BRUNO ZACH

    Zach mainly worked worked between the years 1918 and 1935, rapidly becoming a pioneering and controversial figure of the Art Deco age. His works revelled in the spirit of the time, often featuring erotic subject matter which made Zach’s work so unique - his devotion to the exotic.

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    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: FERDINAND BARBEDIENNE

    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: FERDINAND BARBEDIENNE

    Ferdinand Barbedienne was one of the most famous bronze founders of the 19th century. He was born on August 6, 1810 in L’Oudon, France, he began his career as a wallpaper dealer in Paris. In 1838, he started a foundry in Paris with the artist Achille Collas, selling miniatures of antique statues from the collections of major European museums. A talented metalworker and craftsman, he became known for his meticulous eye to detail and for his reproductions, particularly those of Auguste Rodin and Antoine-Louis Barye. 

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    A GUIDE TO PÂTE DE VERRE GLASS

    A GUIDE TO PÂTE DE VERRE GLASS

    Pâte de Verre Glass – A Short History

    The origins of Pâte de Verre glass can be traced as far back as the second millennium BC, with records being found that indicate the Mesopotamians used the process, or a very similar one, to create inlays for both jewellery and sculptures.

    Methods used in ancient Egypt and Rome are thought to be like those used by the Mesopotamians. These produced glass with similar qualities to those we now refer to as Pâte de Verre. An Egyptian name for the process is “Stone that Flows”.

    The process then fell into disuse for many centuries before re-emerging in the late 19th century, when Henry Cros (1840-1907), a sculptor and archaeology enthusiast, rediscovered the medium. It is believed to be one of the oldest forms of glass working.

    The technique behind Pâte de Verre glass

    Literally translated; Pâte de Verre means paste of glass. The process begins with the creation of a clay model, which is then used to make a mould from either plaster or silica.

    Finely crushed (frited) glass, which has been mixed with a binding material, and then sometimes colourants or even enamels are then layered into the mould.

    When complete the whole mould is fired which allows the fragments of glass to fuse together. The thickness of the item produced can be tailored depending on how much of the paste is used. The mould is carefully removed and the glass piece is then polished and the sharp edges removed.

    Modern techniques have made it possible for artists to use a much more powdered form of the crushed glass which they can control more accurately to create more intricate patterns.

    The Style

    Pieces created using the Pâte de Verre technique are quite fluid in shape, with a degree of external texture which is common with pieces made in a mould. Colours are mostly muted shades, which due to the nature of the fragmented glass and the firing techniques, lend themselves well to blending into each other.

    Amalric Walter 

     

     

    Apprenticed from the age of 15 to the Sevres Porcelain factory, by the age of 30 Walter was a skilled pâte de Vere glassmaker.

    In 1903 he joined Daum Freres at their factory in Nancy, having come to their attention at the Exposition Universelle, and in return for a studio and a good fee, he shared his knowledge of the techniques with them. Pieces produced by him during this time are often signed A Walter, Nancy.

    Walter received several medals for this work at the Exposition Universelle – a diploma of honour in 1900 and a gold medal in 1901.

    Where to buy

    At our Portobello Road showroom, London, we have a selection of Pâte de Verre glassware including some stunning pieces by Amalric Walter.

    5 TIPS TO SAFELY TRANSPORT FINE ART

    5 TIPS TO SAFELY TRANSPORT FINE ART

    As lovers of antiques and fine art, there’s not much we like better when visiting different parts of the world (or even our own country) than spending some time taking in the local art scene. We often find ourselves drawn to fairs and exhibitions of all types to while away an afternoon (or two).

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    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: MAURICE GUIRAUD-RIVIÈRE

    KNOW YOUR ARTISTS: MAURICE GUIRAUD-RIVIÈRE

    Born in Toulouse in 1881, Maurice Guiraud-Rivière was an eminent French sculptor and designer of the Art Deco period whose work survives primarily in bronze. The Nephew of the sculptor Théodore Rivière, he was a pupil of the National School of Fine Arts where he studied under the direction of Antonin Mercié, who was his uncles own master. He was trained in modern design techniques and methods by Antonin which propelled him into his career as a  leading artist of the Art Deco movement.

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    GETTING TO KNOW: DAVID HICKMET

    GETTING TO KNOW: DAVID HICKMET

    We thought it would be fun to do a little interview with David Hickmet, Managing Director of Hickmet Fine Arts, so those of you who haven’t met him can get to know him a bit better, and those who do know him can get a bit more insight into what makes him tick!

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