Chicken

Chicken
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814x
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814a
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814b
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814c
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814d
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814e
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814f
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814g
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814h
  • Franz Bergman Vienna Bronze Chicken 4814i

A very fine early 20th Century cold painted bronze study of a standing chicken with excellent hand finished detail and fine naturalistic hand painted enamel colour, signed underneath with the Bergman ‘B’ in an amphora vase.

Sorry, this item has been sold. If you would like information about similar items please contact us on 07971850405 or make an enquiry via email here.

£ 2,850

Additional Information

Height

Condition

Circa

Materials

Cold Painted Bronze

Page No.

14

Book Ref

Antique Vienna Bronzes by Joseph Zobel

Chicken

Chicken are a domesticated fowl, a subspecies of the red junglefowl. As one of the most common and widespread domestic animals, with a population of more than 19 billion in 2011, there are more chickens in the world than any other species of bird or domestic animal. Humans keep chickens primarily as a source of food, consuming both their meat and their eggs.

Genetic studies have pointed to multiple maternal origins in Southeast, East, and South Asia, but with the clade found in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa originating in the Indian subcontinent. From India, the domesticated chicken was imported to Lydia in western Asia Minor, and to Greece by the fifth century BC. Fowl had been known in Egypt since the mid-15th century BC, with the “bird that gives birth every day” having come to Egypt from the land between Syria and Shinar, Babylonia, according to the annals of Thutmose III.

Chickens are omnivores. In the wild, they often scratch at the soil to search for seeds, insects and even larger animals such as lizards, small snakes or young mice. Chickens may live for five to ten years, depending on the breed. The world’s oldest chicken, a hen, died of heart failure at the age of 16 according to Guinness World Records. Roosters can usually be differentiated from hens by their striking plumage of long flowing tails and shiny, pointed feathers on their necks (hackles) and backs (saddle), which are typically of brighter, bolder colours than those of females of the same breed. However, in some breeds, such as the Sebright chicken, the rooster has only slightly pointed neck feathers, the same colour as the hen’s. The identification can be made by looking at the comb, or eventually from the development of spurs on the male’s legs (in a few breeds and in certain hybrids, the male and female chicks may be differentiated by colour). Adult chickens have a fleshy crest on their heads called a comb, or cockscomb, and hanging flaps of skin either side under their beaks called wattles. Collectively, these and other fleshy protuberances on the head and throat are called caruncles. Both the adult male and female have wattles and combs, but in most breeds these are more prominent in males. A muff or beard is a mutation found in several chicken breeds which causes extra feathering under the chicken’s face, giving the appearance of a beard. Domestic chickens are not capable of long distance flight, although lighter birds are generally capable of flying for short distances, such as over fences or into trees (where they would naturally roost). Chickens may occasionally fly briefly to explore their surroundings, but generally do so only to flee perceived danger.

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