Venus & Cupid

Venus & Cupid
  • Jean Sul Abadie Art Nouveau Venus and Cupid
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979a
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979b
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979c
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979d
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979e
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979f
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979g
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979h
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979i
  • Jean-Sul-Abadie-Art-Nouveau-Venus-and-Cupid-4979j

A very fine bronze study of Venus taking an arrow from Cupid her son, who at times would shoot his arrows without meaning or reason into the hearts of men, igniting their desire. Exhibiting excellent rich brown patina and good detail, signed Sul Abadie and stamped.

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£ 9,500

Additional Information

Height

Foundry

Condition

Circa

Materials

Bronze and Marble

Book Ref

Bronzes, Sculptors and Founders, 1800 ~ 1930 by Berman

Cupid & Venus

Different tales exist about the origin of Venus and Cupid. Some say that Venus, the goddess of love and beauty, had a love affair with Mars, the god of war. Out of this relationship, Cupid was born. In the following painting you see Venus with Mars, who is being disarmed by Cupid.

Cupid has attributes from both of his parents. Like his mother he is considered to be the god of love, or more precisely, the god of falling in love. He is portrayed as an innocent little child with bow and arrows. He shoots arrows to the heart, and awakening a love that you’re powerless to resist.

Venus and Cupid are often shown in intimate poses, reflecting the unique love between mother and child.

Cupid

In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupido, meaning “desire”) is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus and the war god Mars, and is known in Latin also as Amor (“Love”). His Greek counterpart is Eros.

Although Eros is in Classical Greek art as a slender winged youth, during the Hellenistic period, he was increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy. During this time, his iconography acquired the bow and arrow that represent his source of power: a person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid’s arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire. In myths, Cupid is a minor character who serves mostly to set the plot in motion. He is a main character only in the tale of Cupid and Psyche, when wounded by his own weapons he experiences the ordeal of love. Although other extended stories are not told about him, his tradition is rich in poetic themes and visual scenarios, such as “Love conquers all” and the retaliatory punishment or torture of Cupid.

In art, Cupid often appears in multiples as the Amores, or amorini in the later terminology of art history, the equivalent of the Greek erotes. Cupids are a frequent motif of both Roman art and later Western art of the classical tradition. In the 15th century, the iconography of Cupid starts to become indistinguishable from the putto.

Cupid continued to be a popular figure in the Middle Ages, when under Christian influence he often had a dual nature as Heavenly and Earthly love. In the Renaissance, a renewed interest in classical philosophy endowed him with complex allegorical meanings. In contemporary popular culture, Cupid is shown drawing his bow to inspire romantic love, often as an icon of Valentine’s Day.

Venus

Venus is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, sex, fertility, prosperity, victory, and desire. In Roman mythology, she was the mother of the Roman people through her son, Aeneas, who survived the fall of Troy and fled to Italy. Julius Caesar claimed her as his ancestor. Venus was central to many religious festivals, and was revered in Roman religion under numerous cult titles.

The Romans adapted the myths and iconography of her Greek counterpart Aphrodite for Roman art and Latin literature. In the later classical tradition of the West, Venus becomes one of the most widely referenced deities of Greco-Roman mythology as the embodiment of love and sexuality.

SKU: 4979

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