Crowing Rooster

Crowing Rooster
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815x
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815a
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815b
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815c
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815d
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815e
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815f
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815g
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815h
  • Auguste Cain Animalier Bronze Rooster 4815i

A very fine late 19th Century gilt bronze study of a standing rooster with his chest pushed out in a very proud pose crowing with excellent patinated colour and good hand finished detail, signed A.Cain

Sorry, this item has been sold. If you would like information about similar items please contact us on 07971850405 or make an enquiry via email here.

£ 3,850

Additional Information

Height

Circa

Condition

Materials

Bronze

Book Ref

Bronzes of the 19th Century by Pierre Kjellberg

Page No.

164

Rooster

Roosters almost always start crowing before four months of age. Although it is possible for a hen to crow as well, crowing (together with hackles development) is one of the clearest signs of being a rooster. The rooster is often portrayed as crowing at the break of dawn (“cock-a-doodle-doo”). However, this idea is more romantic than real, as a rooster can and will crow at any time of the day. Some roosters are especially vociferous, crowing almost constantly, while others only crow a few times a day. These differences are dependent both upon the rooster’s breed and individual personality. A rooster can often be seen sitting on fence posts or other objects, where he crows to proclaim his territory. Roosters have several other calls as well, and can cluck, similar to the hen. Roosters occasionally make a patterned series of clucks to attract hens to a source of food, the same way a mother hen does for her chicks.

Auguste Cain

Caïn was born in Paris, and studied under Rude, Guionnet, and Pierre-Jules Mêne (whose daughter he married in 1852). His first exhibit in the Salon of 1846 was a wax model of a linnet defending her nest from a rat, later cast in bronze and shown at the 1855 Salon. Between 1846-1888, Caïn exhibited 38 models at the Salon. From 1868 onwards he concentrated on monuments, including the Chiens de meute at the Château de Chantilly, Le Lion de Nubie et sa proie in the Jardin du Luxembourg, and Tigress and Peacock in the Gardens of the Tuileries. In 1879 he assumed management of his father-in-law’s foundry upon Mêne’s death.

Henri Caïn, a well known librettist, and Georges Cain, the painter, were his sons.

To view our range of Auguste Cain’s sculpture please click here.